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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye of course was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling a story that's when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he rode senator dole aide notes that said, i am here. where are you? because both of them when they were recovering from their war wounds had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the uni
children to sweat shop work day? >> anyway, let's check with bob pisani with more on what's moving today. >> let's talk about what the trading day's going to look like. that was the main topic of conversation overnight and through this morning. i would note, folks, i know this is not a good open, but we are well above where we were at the close last friday. so we were 1413 last friday at the close, 1427 now. i think on the s&p 500. okay. it's a bad day, a down day, but we're still actually above where we were at the close last year. we're up for the week on the s&p 500. i think the problem now is going to be talking about what the rest of the day's going to look like. my sense talking to everybody is, they'll try to sell at most of the rallies that go on, just to protect themselves for what we've been seeing here. that's going to be a problem. because i know you're hopeful maybe we'll get a move up toward the close. i think selling into the rallies is going to be a general problem. i specifically was talking to people about that today. we've been rallying. the biggest problem that we hav
. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. we have a big big hour and the iq will go way up. [ music ] >> this is the "full-court press," "the bill press show," live on your radio and current tv >> bill: alan saint pierre from norml is going to come on to talk about what happens now incomed and washington state other than a lot of people lighting up. what are the feds going to do? what are the states going to do? we will get to that in the next hour. heading toward here we are, december 7th, rounding out 2012 and, you know, at this time of year, everybody does lists. this is the list season. right? yahoo has started it by looking back the some of the finds yahoo has found what people were searching for obsessed by. the web life editor, heather cabot. >> thank you for having me. >> what are americans into this year? overall, when people came to yahoo as a search engine what were they looking for? >> i think you will be pleas antsly surprised -- pleas antsly surprised. this is the third time we have been putting together these lists, the top search was a n
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
spent on friday about an hour with bob kerrey. bob kerrey and i reflected back on his experience here in the senate and one memorable meeting that he and i had. and the purpose of that meeting was for bob kerrey to introduce me to the presiding officer. and it was a wonderful meeting because when the meeting finished -- i won't go into detail on everything i said but the presiding officer knows -- i came out of that meeting recognizing how what kindred spirits these two gallant warriors are and were. both having been highly decorated, one in the navy, the other a marine. one medal of honor, the other -- the presiding officer -- navy cross, silver star, more than one bronze star for valor, a number of purple hearts. as i said again, but i can't say it too much, what an honor and pleasure it has been to serve in this body with the senator from virginia, jim webb. i've learned so much about what difference a positive attitude will make. no better example of that is the new g.i. bill of rights. to think that a new senator, a brand-new senator would have the idea, the confidence that i can
him to in michigan, senator inouye made his two lifelong friends, one senator bob dole, who as we know, became majority leader here in the senate and the republican nominee for president of the united states. and his other lifetime friend is the late senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate and the hart building, the massive senate office building, is named after him. asked by his son why after being classified as an enemy alien he and the members of the 442nd fought so heroically, senator inouye said in his usual, calm man, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. he was a recipient of the medal of honor, a congressional gold medal, the highest honor can bestow. he served the distinguished service cross, a bronze star for valor and, of course, a purple heart. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress he displayed on if battlefield. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting that i had, i mentioned it very previously last night but it was ten days ago. i knew se
with their presence. there's usually two or three of them i see. host: moving on to bob in pennsylvania. bob, how long have you been with the n.r.a.? caller: a long time. host: 10-20 years? caller: 15 years. what kind of guns do you own? caller: guns, shotguns, pistols, and i do own an a.r.-15. host: what do you think about mr. lapierre? caller: i was disappointed. i was anxious to hear the news conference and hopeful n.r.a. would come out with a reasonable response and want to lead in the middle. i believe that it's a good idea to have armed edwards in school. -- armed guards in school. the n.r.a. said they would train these people with an unlimited budget. but they stop way short of -- yes, video games and violence in our society, kids playing on these video games and the movies and the music. when i was young, we were not allowed to watch "the untouchables," eliot with robert because my parents thought it was too violent. my parents thought. and now we've come to this. there's no reason these guns should be available for sale. they have no place in the sporting arena or no place in the hunting aren
responsibility. i can remember bob michael getting up and saying i am proud of voting for this. if you want it to the congressman vote for somebody else. that is a gutsy thing to do. he kept getting reelected. host: john from pennsylvania. caller: thank you for having me. i think the problem is in gdp. we do not produce anything. we do not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of i
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
other countries. that's why bob dole and captain dan pe berzynski want us to appe this treaty. i've heard nothing from the other side that outweighs the reality of that consideration for persons, not just veterans, all persons with disabilities. what's really at stake here is big. the outcome here will not, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disability. this treaty will help offer hope where there is none. the united states could actually sit
mark bob john and david and the entire family most of which is with us here in the gallery today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i am also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate including by my count, more than 300 senators hundreds of personal and committee staff members and more than a thousand students in turns. in my experience it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote oneself to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best the senate is one of the founders most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states. some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few times in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way i hesitate to describe our current state as of the most partisan ever but i do believe that as an
that as well as the american people. a lot can happen. just as bob said it -- i said in my remarks that the tax issue could get resolved this weekend or it could get resolved at the beginning of next year. it will get resolved. almost all americans will not pay higher taxes next year. but it could happen this weekend. >> the meeting ends today, if there is a proposal put on the table, we're hearing about smaller-scale proposals to get enough republican support in the senate, and not just get 60 votes. do you need an estate tax -- is it ok if it's just different income and unemployment? >> it would be best to let senator mcconnell and others meet with the president today and have them talk about that in private. probably the meeting that happens today is more for optics and probably the substance occurs after that when staff begins to talk. they ought to work on that together, and i think it is best for me not to comment on what should or should not be in it. i want to come back to this -- the 112th congress has scored, litigated, debated every one of the issues that lamar and i are talking abou
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
. david herring, kent hall, who died on timely death working for me, care are garland, bob vanhuevland, wally, my legislative director who was with me for more than 20 years, tom mar, jerry gaginas, we all fondly call "mom," because she cracks the whip and makes sure the trains run on time. mary naylor, also has been with me more than 20 years. my deputies there, john rider and joel friedman, who have done extraordinary work on behalf of the people of this country. stew nagerka, who is going to help me with charts today, my longtime communication communics director, and so many more. and most  of all to my family, my wife lucy, who has been my partner through all this, was my campaign manager when i first ran for the united states senate, my daughter jessie, who in in many ways has perhaps sacrificed the most because when you're in this job, you miss birthdays, you miss other important events. but she has been a great daughter, and she was here last night for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small far
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21